Solomon’s reporter Stavros Malichudis under surveillance for “national security reasons”

In a closed-door Parliamentary meeting, the head of Greece’s National Intelligence Service reportedly confirmed that two journalists had been under surveillance, including Solomon’s Stavros Malichudis. A few months ago, Minister of State Giorgos Gerapetritis had repeatedly affirmed that “it is self-evident that there is no surveillance of journalists in Greece.”

Dark Waters of the Aegean: 1,018 illegal pushbacks carried out by the Greek state

It has become a common practice for Greek authorities to abandon asylum seekers at sea, which has resulted in injuries and drownings. An interactive map reveals the recurring crime committed across the Aegean Sea. The Greek government must explain how abducting people in need and abandoning them in life rafts is linked to international law and European values.

No closer to heaven — transgender asylum-seekers in Greece

For many transgender asylum-seekers, their arrival in Greece only drags them deeper into misery.

Facing 10 years in prison for an act of desperation

A year and a half ago, a young pregnant woman from Afghanistan, living at the Mavrovouni camp on Lesvos, attempted suicide by setting fire to her tent. On June 22, 2022, she stands trial, accused of arson with intent.

Serbia: Green waves washing over polluted land

Citizens’ growing concern fueled by industrial investments and the urgent need to solve environmental issues has resulted in the election of Serbia’s first Green Party to parliament.

European Court decision finds 2016 collective pushbacks “lawful”

On April 5, the European Court of Human Rights handed down a negative judgement on claims regarding the alleged pushback of approximately 1,500 asylum seekers into Greece via North Macedonia in 2016. ECHR acknowledged their violent persecution, but believed the applicants could have applied for asylum by other legal means ― although there weren’t any.

European Court decision finds 2016 collective pushbacks “lawful”

On April 5, the European Court of Human Rights handed down a negative judgement on claims regarding the alleged pushback of approximately 1,500 asylum seekers into Greece via North Macedonia in 2016. ECHR acknowledged their violent persecution, but believed the applicants could have applied for asylum by other legal means ― although there weren’t any.

Masafarhána: Inside the invisible refugee houses in Athens

In Athens, refugees pay to live in small apartments which accommodate up to 22 people. They often fall victim to exploitation by their compatriots. But sometimes the masafarhánas offer them the forgotten feeling of home.

Unaccompanied minors: The fear of adulthood

Like most teenagers in Europe, they should be waiting for their 18th birthday with excitement and impatience. But for the thousands of asylum seekers who are unaccompanied minors, the day they turn 18 – when they go from being minors in need of protection to being regarded as “men” and even “foreigners” – is a day accompanied by anxiety about what tomorrow might bring and by the fear of deportation.

Dark Waters of the Aegean: 1,018 illegal pushbacks carried out by the Greek state

Dark Waters of the Aegean: 1,018 illegal pushbacks carried out by the Greek state

It has become a common practice for Greek authorities to abandon asylum seekers at sea, which has resulted in injuries and drownings. An interactive map reveals the recurring crime committed across the Aegean Sea. The Greek government must explain how abducting people in need and abandoning them in life rafts is linked to international law and European values.

Facing 10 years in prison for an act of desperation

Facing 10 years in prison for an act of desperation

A year and a half ago, a young pregnant woman from Afghanistan, living at the Mavrovouni camp on Lesvos, attempted suicide by setting fire to her tent. On June 22, 2022, she stands trial, accused of arson with intent.

European Court decision finds 2016 collective pushbacks “lawful”

European Court decision finds 2016 collective pushbacks “lawful”

On April 5, the European Court of Human Rights handed down a negative judgement on claims regarding the alleged pushback of approximately 1,500 asylum seekers into Greece via North Macedonia in 2016. ECHR acknowledged their violent persecution, but believed the applicants could have applied for asylum by other legal means ― although there weren’t any.

Mahmood in waiting

Mahmood in waiting

In 2016 Mahmood left Jalalabad, his hometown in Afghanistan, and embarked on a dangerous journey to Europe. After six months he made it to Greece. We meet him in a flat in the suburbs of Athens, which he shares with up to twelve other compatriots; struggling with the Greek asylum services; making a living on the streets; and strolling through the center of Athens. This is his story.

Solomon’s reporter Stavros Malichudis under surveillance for “national security reasons”

Solomon’s reporter Stavros Malichudis under surveillance for “national security reasons”

In a closed-door Parliamentary meeting, the head of Greece’s National Intelligence Service reportedly confirmed that two journalists had been under surveillance, including Solomon’s Stavros Malichudis. A few months ago, Minister of State Giorgos Gerapetritis had repeatedly affirmed that “it is self-evident that there is no surveillance of journalists in Greece.”

Dark Waters of the Aegean: 1,018 illegal pushbacks carried out by the Greek state

Dark Waters of the Aegean: 1,018 illegal pushbacks carried out by the Greek state

It has become a common practice for Greek authorities to abandon asylum seekers at sea, which has resulted in injuries and drownings. An interactive map reveals the recurring crime committed across the Aegean Sea. The Greek government must explain how abducting people in need and abandoning them in life rafts is linked to international law and European values.

Serbia: Green waves washing over polluted land

Serbia: Green waves washing over polluted land

Citizens’ growing concern fueled by industrial investments and the urgent need to solve environmental issues has resulted in the election of Serbia’s first Green Party to parliament.

Keep our journalism independent, inclusive and responsible with a recurring membership.

The logbook of Moria

The logbook of Moria

A logbook was found in the ashes of Europe’s most notorious refugee camp. Written by the workers that were there to protect the unaccompanied minors, but often felt incapable of doing so, its pages reveal the horrific reality that they endured. The logbook of Moria’s safe zone is an indisputable document of Europe’s failure to protect the most vulnerable group of asylum seekers that sought safety within its borders.

The logbook of Moria

The logbook of Moria

A logbook was found in the ashes of Europe’s most notorious refugee camp. Written by the workers that were there to protect the unaccompanied minors, but often felt incapable of doing so, its pages reveal the horrific reality that they endured. The logbook of Moria’s safe zone is an indisputable document of Europe’s failure to protect the most vulnerable group of asylum seekers that sought safety within its borders.

Name: Unknown – Cause of death: Drowning

“I can’t, I’ve had a difficult time processing all this.” Since 2012, the registrar of Lesvos has been mainly registering the bodies of unidentified refugees.

Report “Modern Slavery: from production to consumption”

Generation 2.0 for Rights, Equality & Diversity in the context of the project design and implementation, collaborated with Andreas Hatzidakis Professor of Marketing at Royal Holloway University of London, who is the scientific supervisor at the research and the researcher Iordanis Paraskevas, who undertook the implementation of the research and the writing of the report.

The night when “hell” burned down

Two months after the fire that destroyed Moria camp, the overcrowded refugee facility on the island of Lesvos, an asylum seeker who lived there, remembers the events of that night and what happened in the days that followed.

Domestic Workers in Greece

Domestic Workers in Greece

Migrants employed in the domestic work sector are essential workers in the COVID-19 response, due to the important roles they play in the care of children, sick, and dependent people.

Grief and mourning among refugees

Grief and mourning among refugees

Mourning is an inevitable experience that occurs following the loss of loved ones. Going through the bereavement process in a host society, refugees are faced with different challenges, very often without even being able to practice their funeral rites and rituals. Nikos Gkionakis, experienced psychologist and Head of Babel Day Center, offering mental health services to refugees in Athens, is our guest for this session.

/ Publications

© Constantinos Stathias

/ Last in Line

A Publication about young male migrants and refugees

More than 75,000 asylum seekers arrived in Greece in 2019 alone, either by crossing the northern border with Turkey via the Evros River or by crossing the Aegean from Turkey on boats, hoping to land on one of the Greek islands.

About 40% of the asylum seekers are men.

© Iasonas Athanasiadis

/ Migrant workers

A Publication about migrant workers during COVID-19

Despite often being undocumented, without legal papers and off the radar, migrant workers are essential workers. Often lacking documentation, access to information and networks, migrant workers are uninsured, underpaid, and exposed to human rights abuses and labor law violations.

But, in big part, their realities in Greece still remain underreported.

WHY

WE

NEED

YOU

The media in Greece have lost their credibility and they are solely responsible for this. However, time has run out, and so have excuses. Media and journalism should communicate with other disciplines in search of common ways to include their communities.

We should make an effort to be more receptive and above all to include the very people we are (supposedly) writing about. Each side needs the other. And it shouldn’t be so difficult anymore, for us to question our ”expertise”. This can make things a lot more exciting.

At Solomon we are not interested in trying to be the ”experts” nor do we want to be vaguely ”objective”. We are interested in seeking and presenting the facts, and being able to share them, completely and transparently, with the people who care about realities. And, of course, doing so without serving any special interests or outside influences.

But we do not want our independence to be the reason why we are forced to work in a state of insecurity and exhaust all of our resources to be able to literally remain upright. On the contrary, we want our independence to be the reason why people view us as a trustworthy news source, and will support us in maintaining our dedication.


Iliana Papangeli, Managing Director

Thanks for reading Solomon

We choose to change the narrative by offering a more inclusive and comprehensive approach to media, in an independent and sustainable way. Wanna get updates made just for you?

You have Successfully Subscribed!