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Chileans vs plastic bags

A group of Chilean scientists have decided to give a weight to the front, and present a real and innovative solution.
September 26, 2018
Chileans vs plastic bags
A group of Chilean scientists have decided to give a weight to the front, and present a real and innovative solution.
September 26, 2018

Are we missing something?

Plastic bags are composed of petroleum derivatives and other chemicals, and can take up to half a century to degrade. The vast majority of this product is discarded without any kind of control, contaminating cities and natural ecosystems alike. The sea and the marine species are one of the most affected. The impact is lethal for animals such as turtles, whales, dolphins, etc., since they often confuse them with food, or simply die entangled and suffocated. Faced with these environmental problems that humanity is facing, a group of Chilean scientists have decided to give a weight to the front, and present a real and innovative solution.

Bags that do not pollute

A group of Chilean entrepreneurs have managed to create plastic bags that are soluble in water and do not pollute.

The company called SOLUBAG, managed to change the chemical components used so far like petroleum (responsible for the indestructibility of plastics), by a new formula composed of PVA (alcohol of polvinyl, soluble in water), allowing these can be diluted in the water without causing pollution in the environment or the liquid that absorbs them.

As the company itself explains, this material does not seek to replace all existing plastic products, but those that by their nature are difficult to recycle.

The process of immediate solubility is quite simple, simply submerge in cold or hot water (you can program the temperature of the water to which the bag dissolves, so external precipitations such as rain will not prevent its use.), Remaining in carbon water, where medical tests have shown that it has no negative effect on the human body.

As a guarantee of this, Roberto Astete general manager and Cristian Olivares commercial manager, took a bag produced by them and dissolved it in a container with water in approximately 5min. Then, Astete took a glass, filled it with water where the bag dissolved and he drank it. Proving the process isn’t harmful to the human body.

The only difference between the traditional plastic and the one created by SOLUBAG, is that the traditional one will take between 150 and 500 years to disappear, the other, only 5 minutes without the need for large recycling machines.

“(With) this material, besides having the advantage of being eco-friendly, you decide when to destroy the bag. You can use the bag as many times as you want. But if the bag is damaged, instead of going to throw it, I dissolve it and I take care of the problem. That is the spirit of this product, “added Astete.

The company Solubag currently produces in China, but pointed out that it could be produced anywhere in the world simply by changing the manufacturing formula of the material and it is presumed that they will begin their sales in Chile in the month of October.

Are we missing something?

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