There is no escape from violence for LGBTQI+ asylum seekers

They flee their countries because of violence and persecution. Once in Europe, they face discrimination again. “We have been repeating that for years: the camps are not a safe place for LGBTQI+ asylum seekers.”

“What does Europe want to achieve? That we will all commit suicide one day?”

A new refugee camp on Samos is almost ready. Nobody knows if it will be an open or a closed facility. One thing is for sure, though: the prospect of confinement in the middle of nowhere leads to the deterioration of asylum seekers’ mental health.

N. Paleologos: “We owe it to their painful experiences, to tell their stories as honestly as possible”

Two photojournalists, Chrysoula Patsou and Nikos Palaiologos, discuss their projects during the refugee crisis, talk about the photojournalist’s mission as a “chronicler of History”, and comment on the challenges that the freedom of press faces in Greece.

Our latest

The cost of agricultural produce in Portugal’s Alentejo region

The cost of agricultural produce in Portugal’s Alentejo region

Diana Takacsova’s photography stresses the role of the essential workers who are frequently trapped outside the formal system, juxtaposing it with the intensified land use and the inadequate living and labour conditions present in the Alentejo region.

Greek strawberries “made in Bangladesh”

Greek strawberries “made in Bangladesh”

Up to 10,000 migrant agricultural workers live in makeshift camps in the strawberry fields of Ilia, which produce the “red gold” that generates tens of millions of euros in exports. While the Greek state remains indifferent, the number of workers is expected to increase, as production is projected to skyrocket by 2025, covering approximately 6,200 acres.

The well hidden cases of domestic servitude

The well hidden cases of domestic servitude

Many domestic workers in Greece have been living in the worst possible conditions. Many migrant women who worked as domestics and babysitters have lost their jobs.

Born on January 1st

Born on January 1st

An unpublished piece from earlier this year that attempts to explain a common and noticeable phenomenon that we often encounter in our coverage of refugees.

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