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September 29, 2020
Snapshots from the days after the fire that burned Moria refugee camp
On September 9, massive fires destroyed Greece's largest refugee camp leaving thousands of asylum seekers without shelter.
September 29, 2020
Snapshots from the days after the fire that burned Moria refugee camp
On September 9, massive fires destroyed Greece's largest refugee camp leaving thousands of asylum seekers without shelter.

View of Moria refugee camp after the fire. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 10, 2020.

A woman with her children sitting on the side of the road near Moria refugee camp. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 11, 2020.

Refugees left on the street after fire destroys Moria refugee camp. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 12, 2020.

Asylum seekers sit at the shore near the city of Mytilene, Greece, September 12, 2020.

Asylum seekers sleep in shadow. Lesbos, Greece, September 10, 2020.

Two men standing in the debris of Moria refugee camp. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 16, 2020.

Asylum seekers protest over the dire living conditions as they become homeless after fire destroys Moria refugee camp. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 11, 2020.

Afghan family sits in a makeshift lodge near the burned camp of Moria, Greece, September 11, 2020.

Asylum seekers bathe and wash their clothes near the town of Mytilene, Greece, on September 11, 2020.

A mother from Afghanistan cooks for her family. September 11, 2020.

Children and young men from the destroyed Moria refugee camp dive to the sea from a platform. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 11, 2020.

A 10-year-old Afghan girl swims at the sea, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 11, 2020.

Refugees scuffle for bottles of water during a distribution by local authorities near Mytilene. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 12, 2020.

An Afghan man builds shelter with his son using stubble. September 12, 2020.

Asylum seekers make lunch on the street. September 13, 2020.

A family of asylum seekers stands on a hill next to policemen watching people protesting against the construction of a replacement camp. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 11, 2020.

A man from Afghanistan refreshes himself. Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 10, 2020.

A man walks among the remains of Moria camp Lesbos, Greece, Sept. 10, 2020.

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