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Testimonies of Greeks working at call centres

Our media lab student Marialena Yannoulatou collected testimonies of Greeks working at call centres.
June 1, 2019
Testimonies of Greeks working at call centres
Our media lab student Marialena Yannoulatou collected testimonies of Greeks working at call centres.
June 1, 2019

Are we missing something?


The performance functioned as a follow-up of the article: The “best kept secret” of multinational call center employees, which essentially focused on foreigners moving to Athens in order to work in such companies. Read the full article here.


A journalist, two architects, a Greek language teacher and a sociology student – in their thirties – are just a fraction of the many who have ended up working as call centre agents. Their employers: multinational companies located in Athens.

For customers around the world who converse with them while they are wearing their lanyards they are just the voice on the other end of the line and an ear to hear their queries.

This mixed media performance allows its audience to hear their voices as humans who are dealing with a job many aspects of which they despise and see, not their faces, but only what can be imagined without giving their identity away. Both their ears and their mouth merge in the headset to enclose their entity and what’s all we’ll get to glimpse at while “they” stand amongst the audience narrating their struggles.

Are we missing something?

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