Testimonies of Greeks working at call centres

Our media lab student Marialena Yannoulatou collected testimonies of Greeks working at call centres.
June 1, 2019
Testimonies of Greeks working at call centres
Our media lab student Marialena Yannoulatou collected testimonies of Greeks working at call centres.
June 1, 2019

Are we missing something?


The performance functioned as a follow-up of the article: The “best kept secret” of multinational call center employees, which essentially focused on foreigners moving to Athens in order to work in such companies. Read the full article here.


A journalist, two architects, a Greek language teacher and a sociology student – in their thirties – are just a fraction of the many who have ended up working as call centre agents. Their employers: multinational companies located in Athens.

For customers around the world who converse with them while they are wearing their lanyards they are just the voice on the other end of the line and an ear to hear their queries.

This mixed media performance allows its audience to hear their voices as humans who are dealing with a job many aspects of which they despise and see, not their faces, but only what can be imagined without giving their identity away. Both their ears and their mouth merge in the headset to enclose their entity and what’s all we’ll get to glimpse at while “they” stand amongst the audience narrating their struggles.

Are we missing something?

Related ›

Migrant women in Greece

Migrant women in Greece

Our Solomon LAB student Noor Omran created this short video about the Melissa: Network of Migrant Women in Greece in order to raise awareness about the inclusion of refugee and migrant women in Athens.

Mohamed’s cave in Granada

Mohamed’s cave in Granada

Our Solomon LAB student Stavros Dimopoulos created this short video about Mohamed’s cave in Granada, Spain.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

More to read

Related

“The state is very funny”

“The state is very funny”

Dandom Howladar owns a mini market in central Athens. Since the pandemic hit, fewer customers shop at his store – and they don’t always have good intentions.

Inside a gardener’s quarantine

Inside a gardener’s quarantine

For a year and a half, Hamid Nasseri moved daily from the center of Athens to the northern suburbs and took care of the gardens at houses there. Until the coronavirus appeared, the country entered a second lock down, and he was forced to lose his job and income again.

“Mom, what are Albanians?”

“Mom, what are Albanians?”

Marios and Mirela came to Greece 24 years ago, and their children were born here. They cultivate garlic − a local product which has helped the region of Platykampos, Larissa, gain international attention. But they are still waiting for Greek citizenship.

“I didn’t know I had to tell my story somewhere”

“I didn’t know I had to tell my story somewhere”

Keita is from the Ivory Coast and has been living in Athens since 2010. As a minor, he decided to leave his family and pursue his dream to play football. But things didn’t quite work out as he expected.

“In Turkey there were 40 of us in a small, covered truck”

“In Turkey there were 40 of us in a small, covered truck”

We met Raz in the afternoon of Sunday, January 21, 2020 at the We Need Books in Kipseli, Athens. He had gone to arrange Greek lessons, which he intended to start. “I am forced to. For my papers, for the language test. So as to bring my wife here,” he told me in fluent Greek.

Thanks for reading Solomon

We choose to change the narrative by offering a more inclusive and comprehensive approach to media, in an independent and sustainable way. Wanna get updates made just for you?

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Share This